Midwife Training: Giving New Life to Your Career

Midwife training works to prepare both men and women for the care that they will need to be able to provide in their professional careers. This care spans further than many realize, as midwifery goes far beyond the usual acts of pregnancy care in today’s world.

Midwives are expected to help with pre-pregnancy care, helping women to plan for having a child and helping women who are with child to care for the child properly. This generally includes nutritional and dietary support. During the pregnancy, midwives help with everything from emotional and physical support to actually supporting the birth of the child. Midwives work toward a safe pregnancy, and work to support the woman as, among other things, a breathing coach. Post pregnancy, midwives provide emotional support as well as any medication that may be needed due to complications from the pregnancy.

Midwife training also helps midwives to understand their general practice, as today’s midwives provide primary care, gynecological care, and menopausal care. Midwives are expected to provide examinations that include pelvic examinations. They may make primary care calls and will help women with menopausal symptoms. While midwives can advise medication, most work to provide emotional and physical support that does not require the use of drugs.

The training for becoming a midwife starts in high school, as specific classes are recommended. Individuals in high school should take general health and science classes as well as courses in sociology and psychology. Courses in college build on this information, diving deeper into health and science courses like physiology and anatomy. The specific training that is provided for those who are looking to become a certified nurse-midwife can take up to two years, and includes courses specific to midwifery. Courses will teach midwives how to handle issues like pregnancy, gynecological examinations, and menopause in a way that those looking for a midwife prefer.

It is possible to go through training to be a certified midwife and to be a certified nurse-midwife. Regular certified midwives must go through certification tests and receive some form of higher education. Those who wish to be certified nurse midwives must go through the training and examination to be a nurse. They must then go through an accredited nurse-midwife program as accredited by the American College Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) association. They will need to go through a certification exam to actually be certified as a nurse-midwife. Beyond this, there are additional state requirements that will vary, but generally include clinical hours and practice experience.

Midwife training is available to those who do not want to go through a nursing program. With that being said, there are more job opportunities available to those who have a nurse-midwife certification. The nursing job market is expected to expand by nearly 30 percent over the next ten years, and some of those jobs will be for nurse-midwives. This is the perfect career move for those who have had an interest in nursing but have wanted to work exclusively with women to provide both physical and emotional support through all stages of life.

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The Midwifery Profession: Attractive Midwife Salary for a Challenging Service

Given the high midwife salary range, it is no doubt that the midwifery profession has now doubled as a socially and financially rewarding job, socially in a sense that the midwife’s job entails responsibility over the mother and the baby, and financially because of the above-average paycheck that a practitioner gets every month. Indeed, the midwifery practice has achieved a new level of popularity despite the presence of the more comprehensive OB-gynecology. With the growing trend in home and normal deliveries, lots of job opportunities await the graduates of midwifery courses.

The midwife salary bracket is currently set at $60,000 to $80,000 per annum. However, the kind of training and certification that a midwife has acquired still has something to do with the amount of paycheck that he/she receives. For example, a CPM or a Certified Professional Midwife can have a higher salary compared to a licensed midwife practitioner. The same thing also applies to nurse-midwives and assistant midwives. They may get monthly salaries that are higher or lower than the standard paycheck.

Another factor that affects the salary rate of the midwives is the length of their service. Apparently, a midwife who has consistently been performing well in his/her job for years can command higher fees as compared to the newly licensed practitioner. This is usually applicable only to midwives who have chosen to work independently. In spite of this, the said fees may still be subject to the policies that have been created by a governing body of a specific region.

The attractive compensation, plus the challenging role of a midwife, has become the main reason for the current influx of enrollees for midwifery courses. In fact, even those who are on active health care services are planning to shift to midwifery. Once they graduated from a certification course, these allied health care professionals can easily market their skills as compared to those who are yet to establish their reputation.

Despite the whopping midwife salary per year, the midwifery profession is not for the faint-hearted. The job can be physically taxing at times. A midwife may be called on during odd hours to assist in the delivery of a patient at home. On top of that, a midwife is required to give moral support to the patients, which makes the job more demanding than it already is. This is pretty much why the midwives get compensated well -they have one of the most challenging jobs in the health care industry.

Getting the Required Certified Nurse Midwife Training

Midwifery brings to mind old-fashioned home-attended births, but today certified nurse midwife training opens a door to a mixed bag of birthing options for women and comprises a variety of occupational choices for nurse midwives. Some of the employment options include:

Independent childbirth and well-woman care.
Healthcare team practice.
Hospital associated practice.
Birthing centers.
Health departments.

First, let’s look at the training for how to become a nurse midwife. This role of nurse midwife is a master role in nursing, so it requires study and practice for certification beyond an RN or a BSN. It’s important to find the right fit and location for this very demanding nurse-midwife program.

When training to be a midwife, there are many of the same requirements as becoming a master’s-level nurse of any kind. However, beyond general nursing practices, the focus of certified nurse midwife training will be on women’s care through labor and birth, as well as prenatal and postnatal care. In addition, there will be classes in pharmacology, and women’s health across the lifespan.

On any given day, a nurse midwife might conduct a gynecologic exam, prescribe drugs, measure a uterus, check a newborn, deliver a baby, and perform an episiotomy.

Some training programs are online, and may allow a student to enter the nurse midwife program with a bachelor’s degree in another area of study. In these programs, there will still be some demanding science prerequisites needed before applying.

Many schools require up to a year of experience in a labor and delivery setting. Some prospective students take this first step by becoming doulas. A doula is a trained companion hired by the client to coach her through a birth without pain medication. The doula attends labors and deliveries but does not perform any functions except encouragement. A nurse considering certified nurse midwife training might follow this track for a year to be sure.

Babies come at all hours of day and night, so it helps to know ahead if your energy level is up for this demanding vocation. The student will also have an extensive practicum before completing a graduate degree in this field. Practicum is based experientially on attending at least forty births along with all the other visits leading up to and following those births.

Additional gynecologic visits, and peri/post-menopausal care is also required as part of the practicum. Practicing these skills under supervision can take as long as two years.

The American Midwifery Certification Board provides guidelines for certification and requires re certification every five years, requiring proof of continuing education credit. Certification exams are administered regularly in a computer-based format at testing centers around the country. Exam cost is about $500, so it’s important to be prepared both academically and financially for the certification exam.

Of all the nursing professions, pursuing certified nurse midwife training accesses the widest array of nursing care skills from birth to death to include regular exercise of basic surgical procedures. Choosing midwifery as a nursing vocation carries with it both monetary and spiritual rewards far beyond other nursing choices.

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Pregnant? Why Should I Choose a Midwife?

Many women choose the healthcare services of a certified nurse-midwife or a licensed midwife during pregnancy. Midwives provide many services today for women, from routine exams and family planning, to the entire labor and delivery process and beyond, to postpartum care. Some deliver babies in private homes, but mostly they deliver babies in hospitals and birth centers. Many offer childbirth classes for expectant mothers and fathers as part of their midwifery practice.

If you are in good health and your pregnancy is considered low risk for labor and delivery complications, you likely are able to choose the services of a midwife. Many women enjoy the one-on-one support they receive from their midwife. They may feel their certified nurse-midwife really understands them through all the time they spend together during exams. Midwives statistically spend more time with their patients during office visits than an Obstetrician. She may even help you figure out what kind of childbirth classes suit you best, or give you recommendations depending on what kind of birth you are envisioning.

Why Choose a Midwife Instead of an Ob-Gyn?

Some women want an alternative approach to childbirth. A midwife often will help you learn about proper nutrition, and healthy habits, during your pregnancy. She is involved throughout your care, from prenatal to postpartum.

A midwife often views this experience as a life-changing event in your life. She has been trained to understand this process as a normal and natural physiological process. Obstetricians are surgeons and are trained in the pathology of pregnancy, labor, and birth-the study of disease. Your caregiver wants you to think about and thoroughly understand all your options for the labor and delivery process. She will probably want you to create your own birth plan. These are topics and issues you should learn about in your childbirth classes.

While midwives tend to support natural un-medicated childbirth, find a midwife who will support you in whatever decisions you choose or need. Certified nurse-midwives have professional relationships with the obstetricians within the hospital or birth center in which they work, and will use their services and support if necessary.

Studies have shown that women who are healthy and experiencing a normal pregnancy will have the same great outcome using a midwife as the same healthy pregnant woman who chooses an ob-gyn. They are less likely to have a Cesarean section or other medical interventions. Women who choose midwives are more satisfied, overall, with the entire experiences of pregnancy and childbirth.

What If I Have an Unexpected Complication during Labor and Delivery?

Medical emergencies could potentially happen within even the most healthy pregnancies. But midwives are trained to recognize these complications and if she can’t handle the problem herself, she has an obstetrician she will defer to for support.

Midwives are becoming increasingly popular. As more women turn to more natural, holistic approaches to health and wellness, many feel a midwife is a better choice for them, since their goal is for a natural labor and delivery.

Does health insurance cover midwifery services?

Many insurance plans do cover certified nurse-midwife, and licensed midwife (homebirth midwives) services. It is mandatory that Medicaid cover certified nurse-midwife care in all 50 states. In addition, 32 states require other insurance plans to cover midwifery care.

If you are having a healthy pregnancy and feel the philosophy and care of a midwife align with your own personal beliefs, know that using a midwife can be a safe alternative to conventional maternity care. Expect the best and have a beautiful birth day!

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Disclaimer: The information contained in this article is for educational purposes only and should not be used for diagnosis or to guide treatment without the opinion of a health professional. Any reader should contact a licensed medical professional regarding their own condition.

Midwife Salary: The Factors That Influence Your Income

Midwife salaries are going to change based on a wide variety of factors. It is hard to pin down the specific average salary because of the two types of midwives that exist – direct entry midwives and certified nurse-midwives. Each type of midwife requires a drastically different amount of education as far as schooling is concerned, which can change the amount of money that will be made. There are various other functions that can change a midwife salary. This information will help you to better understand how each aspect of the midwife career can affect potential salary.

The training you receive as you learn to become a midwife will change your salary. It is possible to become certified as a direct entry midwife. These midwives are recognized as educated and professional, but learn their craft through smaller programs and apprenticeships as opposed to large amounts of institutional education. Nurse-midwives go through a normal four-year college degree and the required nursing education before attending classes for midwifery. Those who are registered nurses who practice midwifery are generally paid more than those who are direct entry midwives.

Salary can also change based on the practice that you run as a midwife. While some midwives stick with pregnancy and child-birth for their practice, others perform a wide range of services. Midwives now handle generally primary care as well as gynecological care and menopausal care. Midwives are expected to handle a wide variety of women’s needs and will make a higher salary based on the amount of care they provide.

With that being said, those who specialize in specific forms of midwifery may be able to charge more based on demand. While some women do use midwives for gynecological care, most rely on these professionals for their pregnancy and childbirth needs. If a midwife is well recognized in his or her profession and has experience they will have a higher salary.

Those who are interested in making a living out of midwifery should know that the job will be in high demand over the next ten years. Those who are in the field of nurse-midwifery will see nursing jobs jump by nearly 30 percent. Nurses who can help in obstetrics will be in high demand, helping to make the job market somewhat open. Most will find solid careers in entry-level positions and will make wages that come close to, or match, nurse wages. Nurses average yearly wages of around $62,000.

If you are interested in jumping into the health care field and are interested in the field of midwifery, you should know that there is a decent amount of money to be made. While Midwife salary expectations will change based on location, education, and jobs performed, there is money to be had. Take the time to research midwives in your own area and see how much the nurses and practicing midwives make. Talk to them about wages and their entry level wages to better understand the salary you may have if you choose to become a practicing midwife.

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Midwife Salary: The Factors That Influence Your Income

Midwife salaries are going to change based on a wide variety of factors. It is hard to pin down the specific average salary because of the two types of midwives that exist – direct entry midwives and certified nurse-midwives. Each type of midwife requires a drastically different amount of education as far as schooling is concerned, which can change the amount of money that will be made. There are various other functions that can change a midwife salary. This information will help you to better understand how each aspect of the midwife career can affect potential salary.

The training you receive as you learn to become a midwife will change your salary. It is possible to become certified as a direct entry midwife. These midwives are recognized as educated and professional, but learn their craft through smaller programs and apprenticeships as opposed to large amounts of institutional education. Nurse-midwives go through a normal four-year college degree and the required nursing education before attending classes for midwifery. Those who are registered nurses who practice midwifery are generally paid more than those who are direct entry midwives.

Salary can also change based on the practice that you run as a midwife. While some midwives stick with pregnancy and child-birth for their practice, others perform a wide range of services. Midwives now handle generally primary care as well as gynecological care and menopausal care. Midwives are expected to handle a wide variety of women’s needs and will make a higher salary based on the amount of care they provide.

With that being said, those who specialize in specific forms of midwifery may be able to charge more based on demand. While some women do use midwives for gynecological care, most rely on these professionals for their pregnancy and childbirth needs. If a midwife is well recognized in his or her profession and has experience they will have a higher salary.

Those who are interested in making a living out of midwifery should know that the job will be in high demand over the next ten years. Those who are in the field of nurse-midwifery will see nursing jobs jump by nearly 30 percent. Nurses who can help in obstetrics will be in high demand, helping to make the job market somewhat open. Most will find solid careers in entry-level positions and will make wages that come close to, or match, nurse wages. Nurses average yearly wages of around $62,000.

If you are interested in jumping into the health care field and are interested in the field of midwifery, you should know that there is a decent amount of money to be made. While Midwife salary expectations will change based on location, education, and jobs performed, there is money to be had. Take the time to research midwives in your own area and see how much the nurses and practicing midwives make. Talk to them about wages and their entry level wages to better understand the salary you may have if you choose to become a practicing midwife.

Get started on the path to becoming a Midwife [http://www.becomingamidwife.org/], by finding local schools to get the training you need. Also, learn more about the average Midwife salary [http://becomingamidwife.org/becoming-a-midwife/midwife-salary/understanding-midwife-salary/] and the steps you can take to increase your income.

Factors to Consider When Choosing a Midwife

Home Birth or Hospital Birth

A good place to start in the search for a midwife is to consider whether a home birth or a hospital birth is desired. A home birth is feasible if the pregnancy progresses normally and there are no high risk factors. In this case a qualified lay midwife can serve as a coach during the birthing process with no hospital stay. In the case of a complicated pregnancy a midwife may still be an option, but in this case the choice would be for a Certified Nurse Midwife (CNM) who works in a hospital setting.

Insurance Considerations

Because insurance usually treats pregnancy and childbirth as an illness, the services of a midwife are often excluded. This does not mean a midwife is not an option, but it may be a limiting factor.

A lay midwife will have a prior arrangement with a doctor for licensing purposes and to ensure of assistance and hospital care in the event of a breech or other complication during the process. Verify that this arrangement fits within insurance parameters before committing to a midwife. This is a very important factor in avoiding nasty financial surprises in the future.

Two Types of Midwife – CNM or Lay Midwife

There are two primary types of midwives. The CNM, or Certified Nurse Midwife, and the lay midwife. An CNM is available in a hospital setting, has specific classroom training and can be a great support in the delivery of a baby. If insurance allows for a midwife, this is most likely the choice of midwife that is allowed. Often CNMs will work as a group and any one of them may assist in the delivery.

The lay midwife acts as a guide during the birthing process in the home environment and emphasis is placed on birth as a natural process. The lay midwife serves an apprenticeship and is regulated differently depending on the state. Most lay midwives will work without insurance and this can be an effective way to manage expenses in a normal birthing process.

Contingencies and Post-Natal Care

Not every birth goes as planned and it is better to decide ahead of time about attitudes toward pain management. In a home birth with a lay midwife the process is managed with breathing and other stress management techniques. An episiotomy is often avoided, but an epidural is also not an option. In a hospital setting most CNMs will facilitate access to an epidural, but an episiotomy is much more likely. Understand the fundamental attitudes of any prospective midwife about these issues and find one that is compatible.

What Is A Midwife?

A midwife is one who cares for a woman and baby during birth. Oftentimes, the midwife’s care also encompasses the pregnancy and the postpartum period as well. This is the most basic definition of a midwife available; the majority of her name is highly defined by where in the world you live.

For example, in the United Kingdom, midwives are medical professionals that provide prenatal care and usually operate in their own hospitals or birth centers. In the Netherlands, these women take charge of the majority of Dutch pregnancies, covering the entire pregnancy, birth, and postpartum period–only handing over their clients if there is an emergency or high-risk condition that develops during the pregnancy. In many third-world countries, a midwife is a birth assistant, sometimes highly trained, sometimes hardly trained, but a birth assistant nonetheless.

In the United States, there are a myriad of different kinds of midwives. Even most women in the United States only know of one kind. For your ease of reading, I have categorized the different midwives into three main groups.

The Nurse Midwife

A certified nurse midwife (CNM) is a midwife who has a degree in nursing in addition to her studies as a midwife. This midwife almost always works in a hospital under a doctor’s care. She is often seen as the cross between an obstetrical doctor and a birth-at-home midwife.

The Registered Midwife (RM)

A registered midwife is a healthcare provider who has been trained in women’s health and birth and has passed the state’s examinations to become registered in the state to practice. She usually offers assistance and services to couples looking for an at-home birth. She believes that birth is a natural process that every woman has the right to experience. While she endeavors to keep birth as natural as possible, she is very keen to notice any variations from a normal birth. A registered midwife should not hesitate to take a birthing mother to the hospital if the birth process deviates from safe and healthy boundaries.

The Lay Midwife

A lay midwife is usually a self-appointed midwife who has not received any formal education and has acquired her knowledge through experience. She has not passed any examinations and does not hold credentials in midwifery.

These are the three basic types of midwives that are available in the United States. To find out which kind is best for you, please research your birth options. While a midwife is there to help the mother and keep an eye out for warning signs, the responsibility of the birth is essentially up to the parents. It would be wise to read books and find out more information about what you want to get out of your birth experience. This will dramatically affect who you wish to hire for your prenatal care and birth assistance.

As a student midwife myself, I’ve seen more than my fair share of awesome natural births in the past few months. Save yourself time, money, and worries by visiting my natural pregnancy and childbirth blog for helpful tips, useful advice, and educational information. Also discover the top five tips to a natural birth!

Midwife Programs: Delivering the Career Training You Need

Becoming a Midwife is a legitimate career move that features thousands of individuals. Midwifery is a respected health care profession, regardless of any stigma that may be associated with the term’s use in ancient times. Today’s midwives are studied and professional, providing a level of primary care to women that is not always connected to pregnancy. Midwife programs help to teach both men and women how to excel in the field of Midwifery.

Individuals interested in midwifery must go through these programs to learn how to operate autonomously. Midwifes are individual practitioners who handle two different types of care: pregnancy care and primary care.

Midwives are known for handling pregnancy and childbirth. Job duties generally start when a woman is pregnant and looking for pregnancy care. The midwife will help the woman check for the health of the unborn child and help provide care and aid to alleviate any associated ailments. The midwife will also work with the woman on her nutrition and daily life to ensure that she is providing the child with a nurturing environment both nutritionally and physically. The midwife will be with the woman through labor, working to get the baby out safely and to calm the mother down as she gives birth. Midwives also stay with the woman after pregnancy to care for her immediate post-pregnancy needs.

The primary care aspect of midwife programs include yearly gynecology in the form of gynecological exams. Midwives also provide reproductive health care to women and meet general primary care needs. Midwives may also help women who are trying to plan a pregnancy, and may help women who are struggling with their transition during menopause.

There are two different paths that you can take when looking into midwife programs: Direct Entry Midwifery or Nurse-Midwife accreditation. Direct Entry Midwives learn their craft through an apprenticeship and direct entry into the field. Nurse-Midwives receive a special Midwifery accreditation after going through their usual nursing program.

Most midwives will want to be certified, highlighting the importance of attending an actual midwife program. Students who go through these programs will be expected to take all the general sciences, including biology, anatomy, and physiology. Individuals interested in the profession will also have to take courses that teach basic midwife practices for pregnancy, nutrition, and menopause.

From this point forward, students in these programs must prepare for certification. The American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) runs certification, including school accreditation and a national certification exam. Students must meet all requirements to be certified as a Nurse-Midwife which generally include some clinical apprenticeship and studying.

Those who are interested in taking the nurse-midwife route of the midwifery industry will see incredible opportunity in their future, with job growth expected over 20 percent. It is important to note, however, that not all of these jobs are for midwifery. Midwifery is a specialized career, but the perfect career for those who go through midwife programs and realize that helping women is exactly what they want for their future career.

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