Midwife Salary: The Factors That Influence Your Income

Midwife salaries are going to change based on a wide variety of factors. It is hard to pin down the specific average salary because of the two types of midwives that exist – direct entry midwives and certified nurse-midwives. Each type of midwife requires a drastically different amount of education as far as schooling is concerned, which can change the amount of money that will be made. There are various other functions that can change a midwife salary. This information will help you to better understand how each aspect of the midwife career can affect potential salary.

The training you receive as you learn to become a midwife will change your salary. It is possible to become certified as a direct entry midwife. These midwives are recognized as educated and professional, but learn their craft through smaller programs and apprenticeships as opposed to large amounts of institutional education. Nurse-midwives go through a normal four-year college degree and the required nursing education before attending classes for midwifery. Those who are registered nurses who practice midwifery are generally paid more than those who are direct entry midwives.

Salary can also change based on the practice that you run as a midwife. While some midwives stick with pregnancy and child-birth for their practice, others perform a wide range of services. Midwives now handle generally primary care as well as gynecological care and menopausal care. Midwives are expected to handle a wide variety of women’s needs and will make a higher salary based on the amount of care they provide.

With that being said, those who specialize in specific forms of midwifery may be able to charge more based on demand. While some women do use midwives for gynecological care, most rely on these professionals for their pregnancy and childbirth needs. If a midwife is well recognized in his or her profession and has experience they will have a higher salary.

Those who are interested in making a living out of midwifery should know that the job will be in high demand over the next ten years. Those who are in the field of nurse-midwifery will see nursing jobs jump by nearly 30 percent. Nurses who can help in obstetrics will be in high demand, helping to make the job market somewhat open. Most will find solid careers in entry-level positions and will make wages that come close to, or match, nurse wages. Nurses average yearly wages of around $62,000.

If you are interested in jumping into the health care field and are interested in the field of midwifery, you should know that there is a decent amount of money to be made. While Midwife salary expectations will change based on location, education, and jobs performed, there is money to be had. Take the time to research midwives in your own area and see how much the nurses and practicing midwives make. Talk to them about wages and their entry level wages to better understand the salary you may have if you choose to become a practicing midwife.

Get started on the path to becoming a Midwife [http://www.becomingamidwife.org/], by finding local schools to get the training you need. Also, learn more about the average Midwife salary [http://becomingamidwife.org/becoming-a-midwife/midwife-salary/understanding-midwife-salary/] and the steps you can take to increase your income.

Midwife Salary: The Factors That Influence Your Income

Midwife salaries are going to change based on a wide variety of factors. It is hard to pin down the specific average salary because of the two types of midwives that exist – direct entry midwives and certified nurse-midwives. Each type of midwife requires a drastically different amount of education as far as schooling is concerned, which can change the amount of money that will be made. There are various other functions that can change a midwife salary. This information will help you to better understand how each aspect of the midwife career can affect potential salary.

The training you receive as you learn to become a midwife will change your salary. It is possible to become certified as a direct entry midwife. These midwives are recognized as educated and professional, but learn their craft through smaller programs and apprenticeships as opposed to large amounts of institutional education. Nurse-midwives go through a normal four-year college degree and the required nursing education before attending classes for midwifery. Those who are registered nurses who practice midwifery are generally paid more than those who are direct entry midwives.

Salary can also change based on the practice that you run as a midwife. While some midwives stick with pregnancy and child-birth for their practice, others perform a wide range of services. Midwives now handle generally primary care as well as gynecological care and menopausal care. Midwives are expected to handle a wide variety of women’s needs and will make a higher salary based on the amount of care they provide.

With that being said, those who specialize in specific forms of midwifery may be able to charge more based on demand. While some women do use midwives for gynecological care, most rely on these professionals for their pregnancy and childbirth needs. If a midwife is well recognized in his or her profession and has experience they will have a higher salary.

Those who are interested in making a living out of midwifery should know that the job will be in high demand over the next ten years. Those who are in the field of nurse-midwifery will see nursing jobs jump by nearly 30 percent. Nurses who can help in obstetrics will be in high demand, helping to make the job market somewhat open. Most will find solid careers in entry-level positions and will make wages that come close to, or match, nurse wages. Nurses average yearly wages of around $62,000.

If you are interested in jumping into the health care field and are interested in the field of midwifery, you should know that there is a decent amount of money to be made. While Midwife salary expectations will change based on location, education, and jobs performed, there is money to be had. Take the time to research midwives in your own area and see how much the nurses and practicing midwives make. Talk to them about wages and their entry level wages to better understand the salary you may have if you choose to become a practicing midwife.

Get started on the path to becoming a Midwife [http://www.becomingamidwife.org/], by finding local schools to get the training you need. Also, learn more about the average Midwife salary [http://becomingamidwife.org/becoming-a-midwife/midwife-salary/understanding-midwife-salary/] and the steps you can take to increase your income.

Factors to Consider When Choosing a Midwife

Home Birth or Hospital Birth

A good place to start in the search for a midwife is to consider whether a home birth or a hospital birth is desired. A home birth is feasible if the pregnancy progresses normally and there are no high risk factors. In this case a qualified lay midwife can serve as a coach during the birthing process with no hospital stay. In the case of a complicated pregnancy a midwife may still be an option, but in this case the choice would be for a Certified Nurse Midwife (CNM) who works in a hospital setting.

Insurance Considerations

Because insurance usually treats pregnancy and childbirth as an illness, the services of a midwife are often excluded. This does not mean a midwife is not an option, but it may be a limiting factor.

A lay midwife will have a prior arrangement with a doctor for licensing purposes and to ensure of assistance and hospital care in the event of a breech or other complication during the process. Verify that this arrangement fits within insurance parameters before committing to a midwife. This is a very important factor in avoiding nasty financial surprises in the future.

Two Types of Midwife – CNM or Lay Midwife

There are two primary types of midwives. The CNM, or Certified Nurse Midwife, and the lay midwife. An CNM is available in a hospital setting, has specific classroom training and can be a great support in the delivery of a baby. If insurance allows for a midwife, this is most likely the choice of midwife that is allowed. Often CNMs will work as a group and any one of them may assist in the delivery.

The lay midwife acts as a guide during the birthing process in the home environment and emphasis is placed on birth as a natural process. The lay midwife serves an apprenticeship and is regulated differently depending on the state. Most lay midwives will work without insurance and this can be an effective way to manage expenses in a normal birthing process.

Contingencies and Post-Natal Care

Not every birth goes as planned and it is better to decide ahead of time about attitudes toward pain management. In a home birth with a lay midwife the process is managed with breathing and other stress management techniques. An episiotomy is often avoided, but an epidural is also not an option. In a hospital setting most CNMs will facilitate access to an epidural, but an episiotomy is much more likely. Understand the fundamental attitudes of any prospective midwife about these issues and find one that is compatible.

What Is A Midwife?

A midwife is one who cares for a woman and baby during birth. Oftentimes, the midwife’s care also encompasses the pregnancy and the postpartum period as well. This is the most basic definition of a midwife available; the majority of her name is highly defined by where in the world you live.

For example, in the United Kingdom, midwives are medical professionals that provide prenatal care and usually operate in their own hospitals or birth centers. In the Netherlands, these women take charge of the majority of Dutch pregnancies, covering the entire pregnancy, birth, and postpartum period–only handing over their clients if there is an emergency or high-risk condition that develops during the pregnancy. In many third-world countries, a midwife is a birth assistant, sometimes highly trained, sometimes hardly trained, but a birth assistant nonetheless.

In the United States, there are a myriad of different kinds of midwives. Even most women in the United States only know of one kind. For your ease of reading, I have categorized the different midwives into three main groups.

The Nurse Midwife

A certified nurse midwife (CNM) is a midwife who has a degree in nursing in addition to her studies as a midwife. This midwife almost always works in a hospital under a doctor’s care. She is often seen as the cross between an obstetrical doctor and a birth-at-home midwife.

The Registered Midwife (RM)

A registered midwife is a healthcare provider who has been trained in women’s health and birth and has passed the state’s examinations to become registered in the state to practice. She usually offers assistance and services to couples looking for an at-home birth. She believes that birth is a natural process that every woman has the right to experience. While she endeavors to keep birth as natural as possible, she is very keen to notice any variations from a normal birth. A registered midwife should not hesitate to take a birthing mother to the hospital if the birth process deviates from safe and healthy boundaries.

The Lay Midwife

A lay midwife is usually a self-appointed midwife who has not received any formal education and has acquired her knowledge through experience. She has not passed any examinations and does not hold credentials in midwifery.

These are the three basic types of midwives that are available in the United States. To find out which kind is best for you, please research your birth options. While a midwife is there to help the mother and keep an eye out for warning signs, the responsibility of the birth is essentially up to the parents. It would be wise to read books and find out more information about what you want to get out of your birth experience. This will dramatically affect who you wish to hire for your prenatal care and birth assistance.

As a student midwife myself, I’ve seen more than my fair share of awesome natural births in the past few months. Save yourself time, money, and worries by visiting my natural pregnancy and childbirth blog for helpful tips, useful advice, and educational information. Also discover the top five tips to a natural birth!

Midwife Programs: Delivering the Career Training You Need

Becoming a Midwife is a legitimate career move that features thousands of individuals. Midwifery is a respected health care profession, regardless of any stigma that may be associated with the term’s use in ancient times. Today’s midwives are studied and professional, providing a level of primary care to women that is not always connected to pregnancy. Midwife programs help to teach both men and women how to excel in the field of Midwifery.

Individuals interested in midwifery must go through these programs to learn how to operate autonomously. Midwifes are individual practitioners who handle two different types of care: pregnancy care and primary care.

Midwives are known for handling pregnancy and childbirth. Job duties generally start when a woman is pregnant and looking for pregnancy care. The midwife will help the woman check for the health of the unborn child and help provide care and aid to alleviate any associated ailments. The midwife will also work with the woman on her nutrition and daily life to ensure that she is providing the child with a nurturing environment both nutritionally and physically. The midwife will be with the woman through labor, working to get the baby out safely and to calm the mother down as she gives birth. Midwives also stay with the woman after pregnancy to care for her immediate post-pregnancy needs.

The primary care aspect of midwife programs include yearly gynecology in the form of gynecological exams. Midwives also provide reproductive health care to women and meet general primary care needs. Midwives may also help women who are trying to plan a pregnancy, and may help women who are struggling with their transition during menopause.

There are two different paths that you can take when looking into midwife programs: Direct Entry Midwifery or Nurse-Midwife accreditation. Direct Entry Midwives learn their craft through an apprenticeship and direct entry into the field. Nurse-Midwives receive a special Midwifery accreditation after going through their usual nursing program.

Most midwives will want to be certified, highlighting the importance of attending an actual midwife program. Students who go through these programs will be expected to take all the general sciences, including biology, anatomy, and physiology. Individuals interested in the profession will also have to take courses that teach basic midwife practices for pregnancy, nutrition, and menopause.

From this point forward, students in these programs must prepare for certification. The American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) runs certification, including school accreditation and a national certification exam. Students must meet all requirements to be certified as a Nurse-Midwife which generally include some clinical apprenticeship and studying.

Those who are interested in taking the nurse-midwife route of the midwifery industry will see incredible opportunity in their future, with job growth expected over 20 percent. It is important to note, however, that not all of these jobs are for midwifery. Midwifery is a specialized career, but the perfect career for those who go through midwife programs and realize that helping women is exactly what they want for their future career.

Find schools to get the training you need for becoming a Midwife [http://www.becomingamidwife.org/] and learn more about the Midwife programs [http://becomingamidwife.org/becoming-a-midwife/midwife-programs/midwife-programs/] that will get you started on your new career.